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Wireless much faster than wired (ethernet)

stonehorse
Connector

Hello community,

I recently dropped my Optik TV service and upgraded my internet from Telus 75 to 150/150. I hardwired to the TV and did a speed test. At very best, I got 97Mbps downloads. Swap out the ethernet cable and tired again with the speed test. Received the same results, 96-97Mbps. Disconnected the ethernet cable and went wireless. Download & upload speeds were 150 Mbps plus. Tried ethernet cable again, speed below 100 Mbps. Tried a 3rd cable in a different wall port, same results. Went back to wireless, speeds are were they should be. 

 

What is going on here? I thought wired should be at least as fast as wireless and more stable. Now before someone just answers "use the wireless and forget the wired". I don't care much for mysteries. Gateway/router is a T3200M with fibre to the router but copper to the wall port(s). Would copper coaxial be that restrictive? Oh, I also tried a different LAN port on the router as well.   

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

stonehorse
Connector

The TV ethernet port is the bottleneck being a 10/100 Mbps and not a gigabit port.  Mystery solved, thanks xray.

View solution in original post

7 REPLIES 7

xray
Guardian

@stonehorse wrote:

I hardwired to the TV and did a speed test 


What does this mean? You did a speed test from your TV?

 

Some TV's (Sony for example) only have a 100 MBps ethernet port but support higher WiFi connection speed.

Yes, speed test app on the TV. 

Port on TV limited to 100 Mbps? On a 2020 model smart TV, I would hope that is not the case. I'll look into the TV's specs. Thanks for the tip.

I have 2 Sony Bravia 4K TVs and both have 100 Mbps ethernet ports.

You can check the status page of the router for the connection speed.

The TV's port is limited to 100Mbps because the TV does not require more bandwidth than that for any of it's smart TV functions. Manufacturers are not going to spend $ to put in a gigabit ethernet card that is not required by the TV.

It would have saved me time and head scratching if the manufacturer just stated the 100 Mbps limit on the spec sheet. I now know 100 Mbps port is more than good enough for 4K. Wireless I'm getting what I'm paying for. Moving on, what would the cost difference be at the manufacturing level for a gigabit port? A few dollars perhaps...I don't know. All a non-issue for me now.

If you really want gigabit Ethernet you can always buy a USB Ethernet dongle. It should work on any TV running Android. I don't know about other OS's.

stonehorse
Connector

The TV ethernet port is the bottleneck being a 10/100 Mbps and not a gigabit port.  Mystery solved, thanks xray.