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Does Rooting S7 Void Warranty of Physical Damage?

BluHairDu
Neighbour
I am not sure if I want to root my phone or not, as I do not want to void warranty. I read a lot of online posts, and a lot of them state that because rooting is software-related, it will not void warranty for hardware-related damages. Is this true for TELUS provided phones?
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Nighthawk
Community Power User
Community Power User

Samsung is unpredictable regarding warranties and KNOX. There are instances where Samsung has refused all warranties. It varies by country. Rooting it will also typically mean no OTA software updates or patches. A number of apps will also no longer work, including the Optik ones in most cases.

 

Again with the Exynos versions, if you want to risk rooting it, you need to find the very specific instructions on rooting it. They are different than the Snapdragon version of the S7. Use the wrong ones and you can run into problems.

 

If you've upgraded to Nougat, there isn't a stable full release of Xposed yet. One of the comments on XDA for it mentioned Greenify was not working yet with the unstable release. Since the S7 would need a systemless root, you'll need to find a version for that and the version of Xposed that might work with Exynos CPUs. I'd recommend waiting until there's a full release of it before trying it.


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6 REPLIES 6

NFtoBC
Community Power User
Community Power User

The manufacturer's warranty does not cover physical damage at all, just manufacturing errors. An extended warranty / insurance plan will cover issues of physical damage, and it should not matter if you have rooted the device.  There may be an argument on the part of a repair facility as to whether rooting the device caused damage such as over heating due to over clocking, or similar sorts of issues.  If you can return the phone to it's unmodified state, before a repair, there might be no way to tell if the item was changed or not.

 

So, ultimately the answer to your question is likely: "It depends."

NFtoBC
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@NFtoBC thank you for the response. It helped answer my question for the most part, and I won't be overclocking. I'm going to decide whether or not to root based on feedback/concerns.

Nighthawk
Community Power User
Community Power User

I would highly recommend against rooting an S7. If you trip KNOX, which will happen as soon as you root it, it will typically void any warranty on that device and in extremely rare cases possibly brick the device. Once it's tripped, there is no possible way to reset it according to Samsung. Basically that means that even if you put the original ROM and software back in place, if it works, it's still void. None of the Exynos CPU based versions can be rooted safely and the only model sold in Canada is Exynos based.

 

Is there a particular reason you are looking to root your S7?


If you find a post useful, please give the author a "Like" or mark as an accepted solution if it solves your trouble. 🙂

@Nighthawk I particularly want to root because there are many apps like Greenify that can conserve battery, and root allows it to save more battery than without root. Also, I am interested in Xposed as the modules allow more features and customization. Tripping KNOX only shows that system software is modified, so how does that void any hardware related warranty? NFtoBC says that it will not affect hardware warranty (except if root caused a hardware malfunction/failure) but then you said it will void "any warranty". Sorry if I sound rude, I just need clarification.

Nighthawk
Community Power User
Community Power User

Samsung is unpredictable regarding warranties and KNOX. There are instances where Samsung has refused all warranties. It varies by country. Rooting it will also typically mean no OTA software updates or patches. A number of apps will also no longer work, including the Optik ones in most cases.

 

Again with the Exynos versions, if you want to risk rooting it, you need to find the very specific instructions on rooting it. They are different than the Snapdragon version of the S7. Use the wrong ones and you can run into problems.

 

If you've upgraded to Nougat, there isn't a stable full release of Xposed yet. One of the comments on XDA for it mentioned Greenify was not working yet with the unstable release. Since the S7 would need a systemless root, you'll need to find a version for that and the version of Xposed that might work with Exynos CPUs. I'd recommend waiting until there's a full release of it before trying it.


If you find a post useful, please give the author a "Like" or mark as an accepted solution if it solves your trouble. 🙂

@Nighthawk thanks for all the help 🙂 I've decited to just wait later on before rooting.