cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

10-Tips For Protect Your Android

v9
Rockstar

ATTENTION - Most of these Tips are well-known for some ANDROID-Users. But for sure some members, would welcome to read more info about. Applying these Tips to protect our Cellphones, doesn't sound a tedious job. There's a link in paragraph-1 called (iOS Secure settings) with [10-TIPS as well to Make the iPhone more Secure]. I'm not prop. any AV-Software. I just want to be helpful to the community.

 

I'll write down the 10-Android Tips ea. of them includes, some extra links to find more info. Same apply for the iPhone Tips to display it click (iOS Secure Settings) A link of the source is provided at the End of the script.

 

1) Download apps only from Google Play Store 

2) Watch out for app Permission

3) Use strong Passwords

4) Encrypt your Data

5) Watch out for your Wi-Fy connections 

6) Always use VPN

7) Disable Notifications 

😎 Apply settings to Google Services

9) Get rid of Unnecessary Apps

10) Use two-factor authentication for Google & other Apps

 

Link: http://blog.kaspersky.com/android-maximum-security-tips/ .By Marvin the Robot 11-7-2014

Any comments on favor or against-WELCOME Stay Tuned! <v9>

 

 

@v9-12 yrs.Telus mobile user & Ex-BC Tel cable installer.
Find this reply useful-Give likes to his author
The future is unknown?
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

nasty
Rockstar

Some of those 'permissions' for apps can't be blocked unless the end user roots their phone.

 

Cell-Provider/Phone-builder Apps that can't be deleted, unless you have root.

 

Need root to run a firewall to block apps calling home.

 

Need root to run a privacy manager. Blocks specified app permissions.

There are apps that will steal your address book and dig around for other things. Facebook a couple of years ago, rewrote part of the address book for the user to use @ facebook .com email address.  Users were not happy at that as all emails went initially unnoticed to a Facebook email account, instead of to the intended email provider.

 

Gaining root is something that you pay attention too, security wise. Cell companies treat root like a boogyman. Rooting your phone means owning your phone without a company's crap telling you otherwise.

If an app won't work under root, it means the app is scanning your phone for certain running processes. They call it not wanting their app exploited. You call it "keep out of my personal information, scum".

 

 

Sideload an Adblocker to hopefully prevent all those ugly popup ads in your browser, pretending to be something else(battery monitor virus wanting to install).  https://adblockplus.org/en/android-install

 

 

Wifi is the big problem, especially when a Cell company does a force install(stock OS) of their own wifi Hotspot definition(#Telus or other cell company) and the end user can't delete it or prevent it from overriding your preferred wifi. Say you are at home/business and there is a cell company hotspot within range. You want your wifi and not another.

Spoofing a hotspot name is a way to collect login information.

Wifi being always on, allow stores/advertisers to track you by its pings looking for its homebase or other base(auto connect to any open hotspot or auto connect to home and #Telus).

 

 

A trusted VPN is good for when stuck with a Cell company that scrapes your data, for selling to advertisers. Aggregated data is still identifiable.

 

 

2 factor authentication. Depends on who you are using.   Yahoo and now Hotmail want 2 factor, so they can tie a real name(by phone number database lookup) to your email account.   

Gmail(Google) at least has the decency to not directly give your personal information to others.  The way their advertising works, is they sell the advertiser a package. That package is 'target your advertising to this demographic' and no personal information is given to advertising scum.

 

 

When you auto upload all your data to the cloud, please make sure it is encrypted by you first and you are the one with the encryption key. A cyber locker cloud holding the specific key, is a nice backdoor. It is better to upload to your personal storage computer at your home, but bad security is habitual.

Apple iCloud users are very aware of how a purposeful security hole can steal your data. Apple could still say they personally did not give your information to the Feds, but a nice little program to crack the password, did it for them.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-29045789

 

 

 

In the end, its all about realizing that your phone is a computer, full of your personal information. It is privacy protected, under law, so anyone(police, company, random stranger) who tries to steal/search that data without warrants, is breaking the law and subject to fines/imprisonment.    When someone(police, work) demands your phone to look through its data, tell them to contact your lawyer.

 

 

 

View solution in original post

3 REPLIES 3

Nighthawk
Community Power User
Community Power User

Paraphrasing part of an article and losing the meaning of it doesn't help. Try just posting the links instead with a simple description. WIthout the full descriptions for each item in the top 10 list, parts of the list don't make sense.

 

Kaspersky did not write a very complete article. There is information missing from it and full complete explanations of some of the risks are missing.


If you find a post useful, please give the author a "Like" or mark as an accepted solution if it solves your trouble. 🙂


@Nighthawk wrote:

Paraphrasing part of an article and losing the meaning of it doesn't help. Try just posting the links instead with a simple description. WIthout the full descriptions for each item in the top 10 list, parts of the list don't make sense.

 

Kaspersky did not write a very complete article. There is information missing from it and full complete explanations of some of the risks are missing.


Ok-Nighthawk: Thanks for reply. I'll take in account your advice for future posts. Good day!

@v9-12 yrs.Telus mobile user & Ex-BC Tel cable installer.
Find this reply useful-Give likes to his author
The future is unknown?

nasty
Rockstar

Some of those 'permissions' for apps can't be blocked unless the end user roots their phone.

 

Cell-Provider/Phone-builder Apps that can't be deleted, unless you have root.

 

Need root to run a firewall to block apps calling home.

 

Need root to run a privacy manager. Blocks specified app permissions.

There are apps that will steal your address book and dig around for other things. Facebook a couple of years ago, rewrote part of the address book for the user to use @ facebook .com email address.  Users were not happy at that as all emails went initially unnoticed to a Facebook email account, instead of to the intended email provider.

 

Gaining root is something that you pay attention too, security wise. Cell companies treat root like a boogyman. Rooting your phone means owning your phone without a company's crap telling you otherwise.

If an app won't work under root, it means the app is scanning your phone for certain running processes. They call it not wanting their app exploited. You call it "keep out of my personal information, scum".

 

 

Sideload an Adblocker to hopefully prevent all those ugly popup ads in your browser, pretending to be something else(battery monitor virus wanting to install).  https://adblockplus.org/en/android-install

 

 

Wifi is the big problem, especially when a Cell company does a force install(stock OS) of their own wifi Hotspot definition(#Telus or other cell company) and the end user can't delete it or prevent it from overriding your preferred wifi. Say you are at home/business and there is a cell company hotspot within range. You want your wifi and not another.

Spoofing a hotspot name is a way to collect login information.

Wifi being always on, allow stores/advertisers to track you by its pings looking for its homebase or other base(auto connect to any open hotspot or auto connect to home and #Telus).

 

 

A trusted VPN is good for when stuck with a Cell company that scrapes your data, for selling to advertisers. Aggregated data is still identifiable.

 

 

2 factor authentication. Depends on who you are using.   Yahoo and now Hotmail want 2 factor, so they can tie a real name(by phone number database lookup) to your email account.   

Gmail(Google) at least has the decency to not directly give your personal information to others.  The way their advertising works, is they sell the advertiser a package. That package is 'target your advertising to this demographic' and no personal information is given to advertising scum.

 

 

When you auto upload all your data to the cloud, please make sure it is encrypted by you first and you are the one with the encryption key. A cyber locker cloud holding the specific key, is a nice backdoor. It is better to upload to your personal storage computer at your home, but bad security is habitual.

Apple iCloud users are very aware of how a purposeful security hole can steal your data. Apple could still say they personally did not give your information to the Feds, but a nice little program to crack the password, did it for them.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-29045789

 

 

 

In the end, its all about realizing that your phone is a computer, full of your personal information. It is privacy protected, under law, so anyone(police, company, random stranger) who tries to steal/search that data without warrants, is breaking the law and subject to fines/imprisonment.    When someone(police, work) demands your phone to look through its data, tell them to contact your lawyer.

 

 

 

View solution in original post