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CRTC new streaming rules and Optik TV

Kent2
Advisor

Since Optik TV (and Bell's Fibe Tv and Rogers ignite) are for all practical purposes streaming services, does the CRTC new rules on streaming services apply to them?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

KHR
TELUS Team Member
TELUS Team Member

Hi @Kent2

 

There's a ton to unpack here, but I'll offer a bit of what I know: Optik TV and Fibe (Bell) and Ignite (Rogers/Shaw) operate with Broadcast Distribution Undertaking licenses from the CRTC, which are governed quite differently than streaming services, even if the underlying mode of delivery (streaming video over the internet) is similar.

 

As for some of your specific questions - some are easier to answer than others:

 

2. TELUS doesn't choose to restrict content to in-home only...it simply enforces the rules that the content providers set out in the licensing agreements. So it would be up to the rights-holders to choose how and when to make content available.

 

3. The BDU license mentioned above requires that TV providers operate either on networks that they own or manage through lease. So for Bell to offer 'traditional' TV services on TELUS internet or vice versa would require an agreement between the two. The alternative would be for one to offer services outside of a 'traditional' BDU license as an 'over-the-top' service, but this would mean that the content-rights holders (in Canada, largely Bell, Corus and Rogers) would have to be willing to license them. Since Bell and Rogers already have some of this OTT structure in place (TSN Direct/TSN+, Crave, Sportsnet Now/SN+), it's anyone's guess.

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6 REPLIES 6

Nighthawk
Community Power User
Community Power User

The new CRTC rules aren't fully in place yet. They still have a third consultation coming up starting November 20, 2023. Based on the CRTC's plan, they aren't putting things in place until late 2024.


If you find a post useful, please give the author a "Like" or mark as an accepted solution if it solves your trouble. 🙂

From the CRTC new release: Second, the CRTC is setting conditions for online streaming services to operate in Canada. These conditions take effect today and require certain online streaming services to provide the CRTC with information related to their content and subscribership. The decision also requires those services to make content available in a way that is not tied to a specific mobile or Internet service. 

 

Note the last sentence. I would guess that takes effect immediately.

Rocky3
Rockstar

Link to NEWS release

@Kent2  How are you thinking it may affect Telus OptikTV

1) Rogers and Bell media cannot produce content only for their own networks (not sure this is a change).

2) Telus restricts some content to the home network only. Does this outlaw that?

3) Telus and Bell TV are basically streaming services. Does this mean we will be able to subscribe to Bell TV on the TELUS network and vice versa?

KHR
TELUS Team Member
TELUS Team Member

Hi @Kent2

 

There's a ton to unpack here, but I'll offer a bit of what I know: Optik TV and Fibe (Bell) and Ignite (Rogers/Shaw) operate with Broadcast Distribution Undertaking licenses from the CRTC, which are governed quite differently than streaming services, even if the underlying mode of delivery (streaming video over the internet) is similar.

 

As for some of your specific questions - some are easier to answer than others:

 

2. TELUS doesn't choose to restrict content to in-home only...it simply enforces the rules that the content providers set out in the licensing agreements. So it would be up to the rights-holders to choose how and when to make content available.

 

3. The BDU license mentioned above requires that TV providers operate either on networks that they own or manage through lease. So for Bell to offer 'traditional' TV services on TELUS internet or vice versa would require an agreement between the two. The alternative would be for one to offer services outside of a 'traditional' BDU license as an 'over-the-top' service, but this would mean that the content-rights holders (in Canada, largely Bell, Corus and Rogers) would have to be willing to license them. Since Bell and Rogers already have some of this OTT structure in place (TSN Direct/TSN+, Crave, Sportsnet Now/SN+), it's anyone's guess.

Thank-you.  That explains a lot. Cord cutting refers to the license. If I get TSN as part of an Optik package it is not cord cutting but if I get it directly from TSN it is. In either case I can watch it through the TSN app.