Pixels!

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DarkJedi
Helpful Neighbour

Lately when we are watching TV in the evening, show get pixelated and I have only notice it in the evening. Yesterday watching Super Bowl it happened again. It has never happen in the early morning at around 6 o'clock. Does this happen to anyone? Anything I can do to resolve this annoying problem?

 


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NFtoBC
Community Power User
Community Power User

A great piece of information at this link:

 

Pixelation is a side effect of data rate compression techniques peculiar to digital image (especially television) systems. Images are (oversimplified) cut up into groups of 64 pixels that can appear, disappear or move quickly, and each of the 64 pixels in the group changes far more slowly if your eyes are able to pay attention to the detail.  

Were it not for compression, a single high-definition TV service could take up the entire over-the-air TV band, or half of all the bandwidth an RG-6 cable could carry.

Now, if the transmission were to be interrupted or corrupted, you would be missing the data for some of the pixel groups. The imaging hardware and software will show these blocks in the same place, even if the rest of the scene is moving or even if the scene has changed (a jump-cut), and you may see a set of skyscraper windows in the shape of a person's face (for example).

Pixelation can be expected if the signal is too weak to decode, affected by interference, or by multipath (echoing). When TV was analog, these would usually be perceived as snow, wavy lines, or ghosting, respectively. 

Problem is, with digital, the difference between a signal that produces a perfect picture and a pixelated mess can be very small, and you can actually have a very poor (unreliable) signal and think it is perfect. In analog, one could see the imperfections easily and could more easily correct the problem causing the poor picture.

So, as a first step, you might want to ensure your connections, etc are all properly seated, and any ethernet cable you are using is CAT6, and properly terminated. You might also want to confirm if the pixellation is occurring on all TV sets connected to your Gateway / modem, either by ethernet or wireless.  Ultimately, if the problem continues I'd check with Telus to see if there is a hardware problem outside your control. There should be sufficient bandwidth to supply the signal you wish to 
watch, but as indicated in the note above, just a small drop of digital data can show as a considerable change to the picture quality.

 

Let us know what you learn.

 

NFtoBC
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NFtoBC
Community Power User
Community Power User

Optik or Satellite service?

 

 

NFtoBC
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DarkJedi
Helpful Neighbour

Optik

Most Helpful
NFtoBC
Community Power User
Community Power User

A great piece of information at this link:

 

Pixelation is a side effect of data rate compression techniques peculiar to digital image (especially television) systems. Images are (oversimplified) cut up into groups of 64 pixels that can appear, disappear or move quickly, and each of the 64 pixels in the group changes far more slowly if your eyes are able to pay attention to the detail.  

Were it not for compression, a single high-definition TV service could take up the entire over-the-air TV band, or half of all the bandwidth an RG-6 cable could carry.

Now, if the transmission were to be interrupted or corrupted, you would be missing the data for some of the pixel groups. The imaging hardware and software will show these blocks in the same place, even if the rest of the scene is moving or even if the scene has changed (a jump-cut), and you may see a set of skyscraper windows in the shape of a person's face (for example).

Pixelation can be expected if the signal is too weak to decode, affected by interference, or by multipath (echoing). When TV was analog, these would usually be perceived as snow, wavy lines, or ghosting, respectively. 

Problem is, with digital, the difference between a signal that produces a perfect picture and a pixelated mess can be very small, and you can actually have a very poor (unreliable) signal and think it is perfect. In analog, one could see the imperfections easily and could more easily correct the problem causing the poor picture.

So, as a first step, you might want to ensure your connections, etc are all properly seated, and any ethernet cable you are using is CAT6, and properly terminated. You might also want to confirm if the pixellation is occurring on all TV sets connected to your Gateway / modem, either by ethernet or wireless.  Ultimately, if the problem continues I'd check with Telus to see if there is a hardware problem outside your control. There should be sufficient bandwidth to supply the signal you wish to 
watch, but as indicated in the note above, just a small drop of digital data can show as a considerable change to the picture quality.

 

Let us know what you learn.

 

NFtoBC
If you find a post useful, please give the author a "Like"

View solution in original post

DarkJedi
Helpful Neighbour

Great information. More than likely it is Telus' hardware problem. When I was watching Super Bowl, it was on my monitor and it is connected to the Wireless Set Top Box. Thanks for the info. Appreciated.

green_sleeves
Friendly Neighbour

We 'sort of' figured why ours was horribly pixelated. Over the christmas break week our tv was unwatchable it was so bad. We share Optik with the landlord upstairs (we live in the inlaw suite). 
There is one PVR, three digi boxes and at least 10 wifi enabled devices, several theme HD packages. We cancelled them all and boom....no more pixels.  For my situation I truly believe there was simply too much traffic for the system to handle. I have no other explanation because before we did that our viewing pleasure was non existent. 
I'm a long time Shaw customer and swore we'd never use telus after we moved but since the landlord was too cheap to order a PVR we ended up buying one and it made a huge difference in pic quality throughout the entire house. Guess they get to go back to substandard when we move if they don't get a 'motherbox'.
Having said that, if it ever happens again our contract will be seen as null and void and I will go back to Shaw in a heartbeat.