Internet 100 on bonded DSL only gives wireless speeds of 50

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Resident

I have read far and wide through these forums and a few other forums, and it seems that my problems mirror those of a few other users. While wired connections give advertised speeds near 100, when connecting to any kind of access point or router, speeds seem capped at 50. This is true for both 5ghz and 2.4 ghz, AC or N, close or far, with different devices, and so on. I considered going out and upgrading to a top of the line router but after reading a few similar posts, they stated that upgrading to a router which should have far beyond the capability of reaching 100mbps, does not in fact do so. I am sure that I speak for several people when I say that this problem is quite frustrating considering that all devices in my household run wirelessly, because it doesn't appear like there is any kind of software tweak I can do to solve this. I recall reading somewhere that this problem might be inherently linked to the way the bonded DSL is setup, and that is beyond my scope of troubleshooting.

 

At this point, the upgrade from internet 50 to 100 has only practically given me a 10mbps boost on my upload speeds. Any ideas?

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Advisor

Yes it is indeed very frustrating. I am glad you didn't waste your money on an expensive router just to experience the same results.

 

I was one of the customers that posted in http://forum.telus.com/t5/Internet-TV-Home-Phone/A-lot-slower-WIFI-on-Telus-100-using-the-new-2200h-...

 

That thread itself really helps to see that the issue is specific to bonded DSL users with the 2200H.

 

"I had one of the Linksys EA9200 Tri-Band routers which was almost 300 dollars and it made no difference in the speed with the Telus package it performed the same way as the WEB6000Q, that is limited to sub 50Mbps. This same router was giving me almost full 250Mbps on old Shaw plan on both my phone and laptop so I know that the hardware is capable of 100Mbps."

 

Also as I mentioned in the post at the bottom even the Telus technicians were aware of this issue, stating "it (the wifi) usually only does half on the bonded, and i don't know why".

 

As i said earlier. This should have been patched with firmware long ago.. or these Actiontec modems should be getting replaced with something that actually does what we are paying for.

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Community Power User
Community Power User

@thesuperguy wrote:

 I recall reading somewhere that this problem might be inherently linked to the way the bonded DSL is setup, and that is beyond my scope of troubleshooting.

There have been a few comments here previously describing what you have discovered. Your Ethernet connected devices will achieve the higher speed, but your Wi-Fi draws from one side of the bonded pair. Your landline, if included in your package is on one of the pairs as well. It appears that this is an artifact of the physics of the service.  Your best options may be to hardwire as many devices as you can, or, if all your devices will continue to connect wirelessly, to downgrade your service to 50 Mbps, and save the few dollars per month.

 

 Edit: cross posted with @Foonus

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Community Power User
Community Power User

Power-line adapters could be the way to go if you can't hard wire. But the down side if you have Optik TV it creates interference and will digitize the picture.


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Resident

Interestingly, I do have powerline, and I find that it also faces the same kind of cap that my routers do. It seems like the only way to get proper speeds is a direct connection to the router which simply isn't possible in my household. I called up telus tech support and they are sending someone over tomorrow. They claim that the tech should be able to solve the problem but after reading these posts, I am somewhat skeptical. But at the very least I was told I would get compensation otherwise.

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Ambassador

Based on the  statement -  "While wired connections give advertised speeds near 100, when connecting to any kind of access point or router, speeds seem capped at 50" - I would speculate that the speed bottleneck is related to the routing performance of the actiontec router.  

 

A   directly connected device will normally be a bridged connection not a routed connection.

 

 

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I have a bonded T2200H modem, but pay for 50 Mbps service, plus Optik TV, which is capable of 4 HD channels at the same time. So there is no way I can test to see if I can get 100 Mbps on my wireless. However, I did test my nearly 10 year old HP Laptop, and got nearly 57 Mbps and a 6 ms ping. See results below. This would suggest there is no hard cap at 50 Mbps. I have gotten different results in the past with different browsers. This result was with Microsoft Edge, but I recall Chrome is good too. Microsoft Internet Explorer has given me trouble.

 

http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/5535114752

 

At the end of the day, if you are all wireless and can only get 50 Mbps, there is no point in paying for 100...

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Resident

When testing speeds with bonded lines in Speedtest you have to use a bonded server-Hy-Tek Computers in Edmonton, Rocky Mountain House perhaps Burnaby. Unfortunately the Speedtest app in IOS doesn't always show those servers.
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Connector

To get true speed results, you should be testing over wired connections. There are WAY too many factors to consider when talking about wireless speeds. Unfortunately, while it is frustrating, If your wired speeds are at 100, Telus is doing its job (I know, socking) Its impossible for them, or anyone to guarantee speed over wireless. You area might be heavily congested with wireless signal or have lot of interface. Literally everything plays a role, form your homes building materials, to the placement of your microwave. Have you tried testing on third party access points other than the build in one on the modem? If you have, and you still get 50, then it is pretty unlikely that the bonded connection is at fault because the access point is just another wired device on the network. The router doesnt care that its an access point. Its not like it says "oh? you are are providing WiFi? you only get 50" . Now I have seen problems with bonded connections but they affect the whole network, wireless or wired. Recently a client of mine had a bonded connection where he would get his 100 mb/s after a fresh modem restart but then then over time they would crawl down to unusable speeds of like 1-2 mb/s and a restart would be required. This was due to Attenuation (signal degradation) in one of the lines. If the attenuation in both of the lines in a bonded connection isn't near equal, you will see speed issues. If you want, you can unplug one of the DSL lines going to the modem and see if you get the same speeds over wireless and wired. The speed will be less but, If the speeds ARE EQUAL on wifi and wired after this test, you can further pursue the DSL theory,  but if they are proportionally different ( for example 50 wired and 25 wireless) , then something else is going on. 

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Connector

Actually, I have used powerline with Optik TV from my Office to detached garage with no issues at all. Funny how everyone has a different experience.  

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Advisor

Finally resolved this issue. Full advertised WIFI speeds attainable.

@Foonus wrote:
...This should have been patched with firmware long ago.. or these Actiontec modems should be getting replaced with something that actually does what we are paying for.

 Well.. it looks like they are going the latter route, which is a nice surprise. 

 

FCCID.io-2985768-bg1.png

 

Unfortunately you will find that availability is limited (still in testing phase in many areas).

 

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ezk360 said:

 

"When testing speeds with bonded lines in Speedtest you have to use a bonded server-Hy-Tek Computers in Edmonton, Rocky Mountain House perhaps Burnaby."

 

I do not claim to be an DSL expert, but that statement does not fit with what I know about bonded service. Essentially what I understand bonded to means is that they use two pairs of copper lines back to the nearest wire center instead of one line. At the wire center end they have to split the data into the two lines, and at your house, bond the data back together again. Reverse for uploads. In other words your bonded service is limited to the physical copper dedicated to your service, and includes a modem at each end of the two wires (pairs). They have to be in communication with each other. When the data is boded back together at the wire center, there is nothing un-bonded about the data. There is no requirement to test on bonded servers elsewhere on the system. It does not matter what they use for service as long as it is capable of the speed they are trying to test to. 

 

Again, just my understanding of how this works...

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Resident

How did you manage to get your powerline to work without destroying your tv picture? These actionec routers are crap and seem to be very susceptible to RF interference from powerline adapters. So far I have tried everything and have yet to get it to work successfully. I even had three techs here at the same time and they couldn't manage to figure it out. Any help you can offer on the matter would be greatly appreciated.

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Advisor

Honesty you are best off trying to get a T3200M to replace it.. the unit offers both DSL and VDSL (duplex) connections and has a fiber port on it as well.

There is a reason Actiontec stopped (gave up perhaps) working on the T2200's and released this updated hardware instead.

 

Here are the specs on the WIFI upgrades alone...

 

– Dual-Band Concurrent 2.4GHz and 5GHz

– 3x3 802.11n 2.4 GHz Three-stream Spatial Multiplexing up to 600 Mbps PHY Rate with 256 QAM

– 4x4 802.11ac 5GHz Four-stream Spatial Multiplexing up to 1.7 Gbps PHY Rate in 80 MHz

– Transmit Beamforming

– STBC and LDPC

– Up to 16 SSIDs (8 SSIDs per radio)

– MU-MIMO (Future)

– Wi-Fi Multimedia (WMM), WMM Power Save (WMM-PS)

– 802.11e Power Saving Mode

– Adjustable TX Power Control

– Band Steering

– Device Steering (Future)

 

T3200M_Specs

 

Wired:

Wiredspeed

 

Wireless Asus USBN53:

Wireless

 WIFI on tech laptop I5 2.66G.  As you can see by the name the network card is only wireless N, but I digress,

 Let's get back on track to the OP...

 

The thing here to note is that this wireless signal is not from the T3200M itself, it's from the WEB6000Q access point on my network behind my bridged mode pfsense router.  This works 100% correctly now, where the T2200 it had sub 50Mbit speeds in the same hardware configuration (as is case for OP). Only the T2200 had to be swapped out with the T3200M for it to work correctly, no other changes were  required.

 

 

How the modem itself would have any effect on an access point (heck any access point we tried!) that far down the line (on a separate L3 switch behind the pfsense router) is/was beyond me but apparently the updated hardware has resolved it. I bolded out that last paragraph in hope that it will be useful to anyone pointing level1 tech support  to this post to confirm their issues as described in this thread would likely be resolved with a T3200M !!

 

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Connector

@Rockwolf If you could give some more detail as to how you have your network setup and what you are trying to accomplish, I may be able to help. The Actiontech and Powerline Adapters should not interfere with each other; however, other devices (especially motors) when running on the same circuit as the Powerline Adapter can cause an issue. Also make sure the adapters are plugged in directly to the wall as power strips with surge protectors cause problems. These are the adapters I use. They work perfectly (for me) and are "transparent" (according to D-LINK) meaning they should pass all network traffic and support all standard protocols.

 

Im sure the techs that came out didn't put much effort in. They aren't really required to deal with customer purchased equipment problems and probably told you the Digital Box should be directly attached to the Actiontech.