ISP Offer IPv6 Connectivity?

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Friendly Neighbour

This question was asked over 2 years ago and had no eta, at that point.  http://forum.telus.com/thread/3521/category//board//


Is there a public roadmap with an ETA on the availability of IPv6 Connectivity to Telus Internet customers?  It's a bit ridiculous that we need to ask this question in 2015.  There are 3 small providers in the Montreal area that provide IPv6, but the rest of Canadians are out of luck?


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Most Helpful
Community Manager
Community Manager

Hey @mtylerb


As @Dark_Knight indicated, the roll out has already begun! 


We’ve taken a phased approach to ensure the best possible customer experience, with expected completion by early 2016. 


The short version: We started with our COs (central offices) and will work our way down to the customer level (modems). Most of our modems will be compatible, including Actiontec V1000H, V2000H, T1200H and T2200H. Once the local CO has been updated, all you need to do is make sure your modem is connected to our network, and it will receive the necessary firmware updates to enable support for IPv6.


View solution in original post


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Community Power User
Community Power User

It doesn't matter. The change over will happen when it's required by Telus to do so. It won't affect end users either way at this point.


If you find a post useful, please give the author a "Like" or mark as an accepted solution if it solves your trouble. 🙂
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Rockstar

Why do you need access to IPv6 right now? Most websites operate a dual-stack setup, supporting IPv4 & IPv6. 


Is there a specific site you are trying to use?

iPhone power user
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Rockstar

Actually, I just used their chat support Looks like they started rolling out ipv6 support in May. It will be done in phases over the next several months. You need a compatible router too. 



iPhone power user
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Connector

Actually, it became an urgent matter to me since yesterday. I had been happily using IPv6 for some time (to access some IPv6-specific projects) using an IPv6-in-IPv4 tunnel, until a yesterday power outage in my area (a car crashed into a power box). When the power came back some 1.5h later, my IP address changed to a CG-NATed one! So I no longer have a public IP anymore and none of my IPv6 tunnel solutions work. I am screwed.


I did not know they are CG-NATing customers behind the customers' back. Today is a holiday but I am going to call Telus tomorrow and demand a public IP (as it was promised to me when I bought the service several years ago).


None of this would happen/be a problem if they offered native IPv6 connectivity. My gateway modem supports IPv6, so what is holding them back?


@Dark_Knight, do you have more info about their IPv6 roll-out schedule? If IPv6 comes too late for me and I don't get a public IPv4 address in the meantime, I may need to find a new ISP.

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Community Power User
Community Power User

Demanding a public IP? They are dynamically assigned and the support people have zero control over them. Good luck with that.


What makes you so sure Carrier Grade NAT is in use? What gateway and router are you using and what IP are you seeing now?


If you find a post useful, please give the author a "Like" or mark as an accepted solution if it solves your trouble. 🙂
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Most Helpful
Community Manager
Community Manager

Hey @mtylerb


As @Dark_Knight indicated, the roll out has already begun! 


We’ve taken a phased approach to ensure the best possible customer experience, with expected completion by early 2016. 


The short version: We started with our COs (central offices) and will work our way down to the customer level (modems). Most of our modems will be compatible, including Actiontec V1000H, V2000H, T1200H and T2200H. Once the local CO has been updated, all you need to do is make sure your modem is connected to our network, and it will receive the necessary firmware updates to enable support for IPv6.


View solution in original post

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Ambassador

@psl Could you please elaborate on how Telus is rolling out IPV6? Will all end users receive a range, like a /96 or a /64? This is the standard way that most ISPs have been rolling it out. If this is not the case please explain why.

One of the main benefits of IPV6 is that every device will receive a public address without the need for NAT.

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Friendly Neighbour

@Kolby_G What ISPs are issuing /96s? That's not at all a good routing strategy.

Even a /64 is a bit too restrictive IMHO. Luckily the default prefix Telus are issuing is a /56 😉

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Ambassador

@skyblaster I believe it was Comcast that was testing with /96's, but I could be wrong, I just saw it from someone on Facebook.


Where is it stated that Telus is issuing /56's, not saying I don't believe you but I want something to show other people.


If that is the case that would be awesome, I was hoping for either a /56 or a /48, wasn't sure if telus would actually hand out a range, or if they would give a single IP and expect people to still use NAT.

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Friendly Neighbour

@Nighthawk & @Dark_Knight​ I'm sorry, but it does matter.  I understand it may not matter to you, but for someone who develops server applications and websites, it's very important to be able to see a website using both IPv6 and IPv4 to ensure that the entire internet is able to view your website without issues.  Like @Dark_Knight said, most websites are running a dual-stack setup, unfortunately if you cannot fix issues with IPv6 because you cannot see from IPv6 perspective, it makes troubleshooting issues difficult.  I'm currently using a tunnel and have found numerous issues thanks to the tunnel that would present a very unprofessional website to someone who was viewing from an IPv6 setup that would not be present to a person on an IPv4 setup.


@psl Thank you!  I'm so happy to hear that they are FINALLY rolling out IPv6.  🙂


@Kolby_G​ I agree, though I'm not sure a few billion addresses are required for my home network.  I would definitely prefer to have a range and not a single address with a NAT and related issues.

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TELUS Employee
TELUS Employee

Hi @mtylerb​,


Thanks for asking! Canadians are most definitely not out of luck, particularly if they're a current or future TELUS customer. We began enabling IPv6 for large numbers of TELUS Internet subscribers beginning in July of this year, and the effort will continue until all eligible subscribers have IPv6, planned to complete in early 2016 as indicated by @psl​. Currently the main eligibility criteria is that you have an Actiontec gateway, with service on our Converged Edge network (which is the network serving the majority of our subscribers). Zyxel gateways will also receive a future update to enable IPv6. For those curious enough, you can see the results of the IPv6 enablement at TELUS on Canadian IPv6 statistics. Check out the following graph shoing that Canada was under 0.5% of users with IPv6 in June before our effort began enabling large numbers of subscribers, now leading Canada to have over 1.1% of users with IPv6 access:


http://6lab.cisco.com/stats/cible.php?country=CA&option=users


@Kolby_G​, we indeed are giving a /56 as the standard prefix delegated to TELUS Internet subscribers. By providing more than a mere /64 we are giving our subscribers the benefit of address space for subnetting of their home network as well as the potential for exciting new network protocols meant for home networks.

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Ambassador

@Matthew_Wilder​ Thank you for confirming that Telus will be offering /56 ranges, this is very good to hear :).


I am curious about what you said here "Currently the main eligibility criteria is that you have an Actiontec gateway, with service on our Converged Edge network (which is the network serving the majority of our subscribers). Zyxel gateways will also receive a future update to enable IPv6."


What about people using their own router (assuming it is IPV6 capable), I know I will never be using the router Telus provides. How will people be notified when it is available in their area? 


Also, how static will this range be, will it be a permanent address range for the account, or will it change every few days like the current IPV4 addresses?


Will the port blocks be lifted for IPV6 addresses? They were implemented back in 2004 and none of the reasons apply anymore.

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Resident

I saw I had an IPv6 address yesterday, probably had it for a few weeks. I see that the Actiontec gateway gets a /56 from Telus and then uses a /64 from that for the LAN.


I have a Cisco router connected to the bridge port and wanted to see if I could get IPv6 to it. Telus uses DHCPv6 prefix delegation to assign the /56, so I configured the WAN interface to take that prefix. I used the FF/64 network for my WAN interface.


interface FastEthernet4

 ipv6 address autoconfig default

 ipv6 dhcp client pd dhcp-prefix rapid-commit

 ipv6 address dhcp-prefix 0:0:0:FF::/64 eui-64


Now I have 00-FE to assign to create any other subnets on my router. Fantastic!


Thank you Telus!  I figured when we got IPv6 addresses we would just get a /64. Getting a /56 is great for those of use who like to set up our own networks.




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TELUS Employee
TELUS Employee

Hey @Leif_E​, you're very welcome! Enjoy. 🙂


Hi @Kolby_G​, great point, I see I could have been more clear and covered this (not uncommon) case. We don't have a notification system planned since the roll-out is largely invisible to our customers. What I think will work best for you is that I'll message you to help identify the network information (on our side of your service) in order to see when our edge router will be enabled on our schedule. I can certainly keep an eye if it is not yet scheduled and let you know when it is ready. Watch for a message from me! As for the "static-ness" of the IPv6 addresses, it will be very similar to what you see with IPv4 today. Some data I've just seen actually suggests that nearly 90% of subscribers will have the same IP Address from us over a month at a time. It tends to stay the same unless the router is turned off or we've been doing network upgrades. I hope this helps - and I look forward to helping you find out the timeline for the IPv6 capability of your service!

Neighbour

I have been trying to set this up "the hard way", and before I do too much more troubleshooting I wanted to find out if what I think should be happening is actually how it would happen.


I  have a linux router in between the actiontec modem and my internal clients.  If I use SLAAC the external interface of my router gets an IP and I can use IP6 from that machine.  I would like to use DHCPv6 to request a subnet delegation from the actiontec modem, however every time I try I recieve a "NoPrefixAvail" message back in the modem's DHCP advertisement.  Is what I'm doing supposed to work?  Has anyone been able to confirm this configuration?  My plan was to use the subnet returned by DHCPv6 to provision the internal clients.


My actiontec router is model V1000H, and I am using the wide-dhcpv6-client to request the subnet delegation.


Thank you.

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Community Power User
Community Power User

You may be expecting too much from a residential gateway. It's not the most advanced device out there.


https://www.actiontec.com/products/faqs.php?pid=191#q20

Q. Does this device support IPv6? 

A. No this device does not support IPv6.


If you find a post useful, please give the author a "Like" or mark as an accepted solution if it solves your trouble. 🙂
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Neighbour

The router definitely supports IPv6 (please see the attached image), but you're right @Nighthawk​​, perhaps it doesn't support IPv6 subnet delegation. It *is* answering my DHCPv6 request, though, just with a "No subnets available" message.  I'm hoping someone from Telus can let me know...



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Ambassador

@ShaunLanig What exactly do you mean by "linux router". Is this an actual linux machine with routing set up? If so why are you going through the actiontec? Why not just hook your router directly to the alcatel modem (assuming you're on fiber)?


@Matthew_Wilder It will be interesting to see how a dynamic IPV6 range will work out. I can't really imagine L3 routing working very well if the interface address keeps changing, but then again I haven't really tested much with IPV6, waiting for an official rollout rather then playing with half working tunnels.

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Neighbour

@Kolby_G​: It's an actual machine with routing. My actiontec is a DSL modem, so I don't think I can connect directly, but correct me if I'm wrong. I have tried setting the linux machine as the IPv6 DMZ gateway, but the actiontec still answers DHCPv6 requests that my linux box submits.

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Ambassador

@ShaunLaing​ Ahh, **bleep**. I don't know of a way to completely bypass it with DSL, only fiber. It's strange that it's answering the requests in bridge mode, it should turn off the routing features completely. If it can answer DHCP requests it's definitely not acting as a simple modem.


I don't have an actiontec so I cant try this, but is there a way to turn off the DHCP server and client on the actiontec? I doubt the option is available with the standard login, but unless they changed the root password it can be easily found by googling ;).


One other thing worth mentioning, are you sure it's the actiontec responding with the "NoPrefixAvail" message and not Telus's actual DHCP servers? If its the actual DHCP servers responding with that message it could be that Telus only provides one range per account, and your actiontec has already taken it. In that case you could try to set the external interface's mac address on the linux box to the same as the actiontec's, then rebooting both to see if it will grab the range instead. If this doesn't work its possible that your actiontec is actually still acting as a router, but it has just switched that one port to a bridge sharing the external interface. In bridge mode I would think that the actiontec shouldn't even get an external IPV4 address, which it clearly is getting. Unfortunately if they only offer one range, and the actiontec isn't actually turning off its DHCPv6 client, what you're trying to do may not be possible :(.

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Resident

I've confirmed that I have two /56s: one assigned to the Actiontec modem and the other assigned to my router (attached to port 1 of the Actiontec which is configured in bridging mode)?


@ShaunLaing​ do you have your router connected to port 1 and is the Actiontec configured for bridging on that port? That's the only way you will get the Telus DHCP server rather than the Actiontech's. You should also get a public IPv4 address on your router.

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Ambassador

@Leif_E That's good to hear, I was hoping that was the case. I wish they were available in my area now :P.

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Advocate

I am on IP v6 IP address with Telus internet service. This first ISP in Canada to connect me to the REAL IP v6 address .. I  gotta say it is long butt IP address. LOL! 

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Friendly Neighbour

@ShaunLaing I have a V1000H in full bridge mode with an OpenWRT router handling the routing. This may or may not relate to your issue, but using tcpdump to watch the DHCPv6 traffic on ports 546 and 547 I do recall seeing the "NoPrefixAvail" error message when requesting a subnet larger than /56.


@Kolby_G Regarding the static-ness of prefixes; if you simply reboot your modem/router you will most likely receive the previous prefix (same behavior as with dynamic IPv4 addressing). From my testing, a DHCPv6 release is required before a new prefix is issued. I'll have to test the DHCPv6 "norelease" option in OpenWRT. I would assume that if you never release the prefix, the server will continually issue the same one barring any forced releases from the server itself.

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Ambassador

@skyblaster

I wish that were the case for me. I am currently on my 12th IPV4 address in my 10 months with Telus. My router has 463 days of uptime and I have never manually released my IP. With my previous ISP I had the same address for 3.5 years. This address had even lasted through a 12 hour power failure.

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Organizer

Hi all, i am on DSL with T1200 port 1 bridge using Tomato Shibby 132.

i also have a ubnt ER-X but ill worry about that later

i feel i have all the IPV6 settings correct, but i cant figure out whats wrong, everytime i do a release/renew, ipv6 gets through for 5 pings, then cuts out.

i made a video

i have setup for DHCPv6-PD /56 i have manual DNS entered same DNS my T1200 showed and i have SLAAC DHCP on lan enabled

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUpyeEeXJ2M

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Ambassador

@Connor What are your settings? Does tomato have some sort of command to print out all settings relating to IPV6? If so pastebin it and link it here and I'll take a look, the video is helpful but a configuration printout would be much easier to scan through. May I ask why your not using the ER-X, I'm not sure which router you have running tomato but I'm willing to bet the ER is much much better ;).


I just got IPv6 enabled in my town so I haven't had too much time to play with it yet. I've been doing testing with a Mikrotik CCR so far, no issues, however there are some things I haven't figured out yet.


Here's what I've been successful with so far (note that I am on fiber, not DSL, so I'm not sure what differences there may be in feature availability):


Grabbed 2x /56 ranges via the WAN interface

Assigned 6 pools of /64 ranges per /56 range

Distributed those /64 ranges to different VLANS via the Mikrotik DHCPv6 Server


Other then that I haven't played with much, I'm still unsure of how I'm going to integrate this into my actual network. I am not aware of a way to dynamically assign a pool to my production DHCP server (Windows 2012R2) every time my /56 changes with Telus. I'm sure its possible with scripts, but it's going to be a PITA.


Another thing I haven't found a way around is how to setup VLAN routing with IPv6, since the range is dynamic, the interface address keeps needing to be changed.


Example:

In IPv4 my VOIP VLAN has an interface address of 172.18.201.1/26 but in IPv6 I can assign somthing like 2001::201:0001/122 but then if my range changes I need to change the interface address to reflect the address pool change. I will probably do more extensive testing on this issue next week, hopefully I overlooked something other wise I can see I'll be making a lot of scripts....


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Organizer

i got logs, this is what gets created when i do a renew

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: using nameserver 75.153.176.9#53

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: read /etc/hosts - 3 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: read /etc/dnsmasq/hosts/hosts - 4 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15304]: read /etc/dnsmasq/dhcp/dhcp-hosts

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15304]: RTR-ADVERT(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00::

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15304]: SLAAC-CONFIRM(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00:6ead:f8ff:fefa:6d87 Chromecast

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 user.debug preinit[1]: 182: pptp peerdns disabled

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: reading /etc/resolv.dnsmasq

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10a::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10b::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: using nameserver 75.153.176.1#53

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: using nameserver 75.153.176.9#53

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53

Nov 24 02:20:23 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15304]: exiting on receipt of SIGTERM

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: started, version 2.73 cachesize 1500

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: compile time options: IPv6 GNU-getopt no-RTC no-DBus no-i18n no-IDN DHCP DHCPv6 no-Lua TFTP no-conntrack ipset Tomato-helper auth DNSSEC loop-detect inotify

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: DNSSEC validation enabled

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: DNSSEC signature timestamps not checked until first cache reload

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15310]: warning: interface ppp9 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15310]: warning: interface ppp8 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15310]: warning: interface ppp7 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15310]: warning: interface ppp6 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15310]: warning: interface ppp5 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15310]: warning: interface ppp4 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: asynchronous logging enabled, queue limit is 5 messages

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: DHCP, IP range 192.168.1.10 -- 192.168.1.254, lease time 1d

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: DHCPv6 stateless on br*

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: DHCPv4-derived IPv6 names on br*

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: router advertisement on br*

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: DHCPv6 stateless on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: DHCPv4-derived IPv6 names on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: router advertisement on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: RTR-ADVERT(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00::

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: IPv6 router advertisement enabled

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: reading /etc/resolv.dnsmasq

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10a::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10b::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 75.153.176.1#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 75.153.176.9#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: read /etc/hosts - 3 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: read /etc/dnsmasq/hosts/hosts - 4 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: read /etc/dnsmasq/dhcp/dhcp-hosts

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: RTR-ADVERT(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00::

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15310]: SLAAC-CONFIRM(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00:6ead:f8ff:fefa:6d87 Chromecast

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 user.debug preinit[1]: 182: pptp peerdns disabled

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: reading /etc/resolv.dnsmasq

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10a::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10b::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 75.153.176.1#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 75.153.176.9#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 kern.warn kernel: ACCEPT IN=vlan2 OUT= MACsrc=00:d0:f6:3c:29:25 MACDST=44:d9:e7:07:73:b9 MACPROTO=86dd src=fe80:0000:0000:0000:02d0:f6ff:fe3c:2788 DST=fe80:0000:0000:0000:46d9:e7ff:fe07:73b9 LEN=137 TC=64 HOPLIMIT=255 FLOWLBL=0 PROTO=UDP SPT=547 DPT=546 LEN=97 

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15310]: exiting on receipt of SIGTERM

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: started, version 2.73 cachesize 1500

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: compile time options: IPv6 GNU-getopt no-RTC no-DBus no-i18n no-IDN DHCP DHCPv6 no-Lua TFTP no-conntrack ipset Tomato-helper auth DNSSEC loop-detect inotify

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: DNSSEC validation enabled

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: DNSSEC signature timestamps not checked until first cache reload

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15342]: warning: interface ppp9 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15342]: warning: interface ppp8 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15342]: warning: interface ppp7 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15342]: warning: interface ppp6 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15342]: warning: interface ppp5 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15342]: warning: interface ppp4 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: asynchronous logging enabled, queue limit is 5 messages

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: DHCP, IP range 192.168.1.10 -- 192.168.1.254, lease time 1d

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: DHCPv6 stateless on br*

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: DHCPv4-derived IPv6 names on br*

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: router advertisement on br*

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: DHCPv6 stateless on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: DHCPv4-derived IPv6 names on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: router advertisement on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: RTR-ADVERT(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00::

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: IPv6 router advertisement enabled

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: reading /etc/resolv.dnsmasq

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10a::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10b::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 75.153.176.1#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 75.153.176.9#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: read /etc/hosts - 3 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: read /etc/dnsmasq/hosts/hosts - 4 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: read /etc/dnsmasq/dhcp/dhcp-hosts

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: RTR-ADVERT(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00::

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15342]: SLAAC-CONFIRM(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00:6ead:f8ff:fefa:6d87 Chromecast

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 user.debug preinit[1]: 182: pptp peerdns disabled

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: reading /etc/resolv.dnsmasq

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10a::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10b::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 75.153.176.1#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 75.153.176.9#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53

Nov 24 02:20:24 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15342]: exiting on receipt of SIGTERM

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: started, version 2.73 cachesize 1500

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: compile time options: IPv6 GNU-getopt no-RTC no-DBus no-i18n no-IDN DHCP DHCPv6 no-Lua TFTP no-conntrack ipset Tomato-helper auth DNSSEC loop-detect inotify

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: DNSSEC validation enabled

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: DNSSEC signature timestamps not checked until first cache reload

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15348]: warning: interface ppp9 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15348]: warning: interface ppp8 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15348]: warning: interface ppp7 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15348]: warning: interface ppp6 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15348]: warning: interface ppp5 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15348]: warning: interface ppp4 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: asynchronous logging enabled, queue limit is 5 messages

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: DHCP, IP range 192.168.1.10 -- 192.168.1.254, lease time 1d

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: DHCPv6 stateless on br*

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: DHCPv4-derived IPv6 names on br*

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: router advertisement on br*

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: DHCPv6 stateless on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: DHCPv4-derived IPv6 names on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: router advertisement on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: RTR-ADVERT(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00::

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: IPv6 router advertisement enabled

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: reading /etc/resolv.dnsmasq

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10a::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10b::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 75.153.176.1#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 75.153.176.9#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: read /etc/hosts - 3 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: read /etc/dnsmasq/hosts/hosts - 4 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: read /etc/dnsmasq/dhcp/dhcp-hosts

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: RTR-ADVERT(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00::

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15348]: SLAAC-CONFIRM(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00:6ead:f8ff:fefa:6d87 Chromecast

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 kern.warn kernel: DROP IN=vlan2 OUT= MACsrc=00:d0:f6:3c:29:25 MACDST=44:d9:e7:07:73:b9 MACPROTO=0800 src=209.52.189.118 DST=162.156.174.116 LEN=112 TOS=0x04 PREC=0x00 TTL=62 ID=25142 PROTO=TCP SPT=443 DPT=46482 SEQ=3373480433 ACK=1251039793 WINDOW=621 RES=0x00 ACK PSH URGP=0 OPT (0101080AB44CF80B0077F256) 

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 kern.warn kernel: ACCEPT IN=vlan2 OUT= MACsrc=00:d0:f6:3c:29:25 MACDST=44:d9:e7:07:73:b9 MACPROTO=86dd src=fe80:0000:0000:0000:02d0:f6ff:fe3c:2788 DST=fe80:0000:0000:0000:46d9:e7ff:fe07:73b9 LEN=137 TC=64 HOPLIMIT=255 FLOWLBL=0 PROTO=UDP SPT=547 DPT=546 LEN=97 

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 user.debug preinit[1]: 182: pptp peerdns disabled

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: reading /etc/resolv.dnsmasq

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10a::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10b::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 75.153.176.1#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 75.153.176.9#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15348]: exiting on receipt of SIGTERM

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: started, version 2.73 cachesize 1500

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: compile time options: IPv6 GNU-getopt no-RTC no-DBus no-i18n no-IDN DHCP DHCPv6 no-Lua TFTP no-conntrack ipset Tomato-helper auth DNSSEC loop-detect inotify

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: DNSSEC validation enabled

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: DNSSEC signature timestamps not checked until first cache reload

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15354]: warning: interface ppp9 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15354]: warning: interface ppp8 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15354]: warning: interface ppp7 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15354]: warning: interface ppp6 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15354]: warning: interface ppp5 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.warn dnsmasq[15354]: warning: interface ppp4 does not currently exist

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: asynchronous logging enabled, queue limit is 5 messages

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: DHCP, IP range 192.168.1.10 -- 192.168.1.254, lease time 1d

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: DHCPv6 stateless on br*

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: DHCPv4-derived IPv6 names on br*

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: router advertisement on br*

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: DHCPv6 stateless on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: DHCPv4-derived IPv6 names on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: router advertisement on 2001:569:742b:fb00::, constructed for br0

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: RTR-ADVERT(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00::

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: IPv6 router advertisement enabled

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: reading /etc/resolv.dnsmasq

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10a::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: using nameserver 2001:568:ff09:10b::58#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: using nameserver 75.153.176.1#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: using nameserver 75.153.176.9#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: read /etc/hosts - 3 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq[15354]: read /etc/dnsmasq/hosts/hosts - 4 addresses

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: read /etc/dnsmasq/dhcp/dhcp-hosts

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: RTR-ADVERT(br0) 2001:569:742b:fb00::

Nov 24 02:20:25 R7000 daemon.info dnsmasq-dhcp[15354]: SLAAC-CONFIRM(br0) 


 

Highlighted
Friendly Neighbour

@Kolby_G​ Not sure if this is what you're going for, but for your VLAN strategy you may want to look into distributing a separate ULA prefix. OpenWrt assigns a /48 by default.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unique_local_address


@Connor​ I posted the following response on YouTube in case you missed it:

Does the same thing happen using stock R7000 firmware? Sadly this router uses a Broadcom wireless chipset not supported under OpenWrt. DHCPv6-PD with Telus is working great on my WNDR3700v4 running Chaos Calmer 15.05.