cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

IPv6 connectivity

skyblaster
Neighbour

Is there a public roadmap to when Telus will provide IPv6 connectivity to residential and/or mobile customers?

Will there be any DSLAM compatibilty issues as an ADSL customer?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Matthew_Wilder
TELUS Employee
TELUS Employee

Hi @mtylerb​ and @skyblaster​,


I am happy to share that we are in the midst of enabling IPv6 for eligible TELUS Internet subscribers. To be eligible you must be on our Converged Edge network (true of most TELUS Internet subscribers) and have an Actiontec gateway. Zyxel gateways will be enabled with a firmware update, likely in 2016. I hope you enjoy the addition of IPv6 connectivity coming soon to you!

View solution in original post

31 REPLIES 31

Dan_Seibel
TELUS Employee
TELUS Employee

Hmm what you are showing is interesting, and something doesn't seem to be working right.  The dhcp options won't have anything to do with if a RA gets sent or not (or they shouldn't).

Do you know if you are on GPON or DSL?

I may need some more info to take a look into this, I will send you a PM this week.

JVillain
Just Moved In

For any one using the TRENDnet TEW-812DRU and hoping to bridge it to the internet and rock some IPv6 your in for some heart ache. At least the standard firmware does not support IP6 DHCP, only static routing. There is a dd-wrt firmware version available from the trendnet site that I haven't loaded yet. But the documentation from dd-wrt about enabling IP6 makes it clear that the firmware doesn't come with iptablesv6 so if you did get it going your internal network would effectively be right on the internet.  There are ways to load iptablesV6 but it is going to be way out side of the comfort zone of 99% of users. The doc is here if you want to read it.

 

https://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/IPv6

 

I am probably going to take a run at it in the near future and will post if I have success. I hope this saves some one some time.

ok, so ipv6 has been working great for me since i got it working good except for i still havnt been able to get my router its own ipv6 address, and i cant see the /56 subnet, but i can see the /64 i have assigned to my switch, really , i dont need my router to have its own ipv6 address, but i would like to figure this out...

here is my interface setup

interfaces {
    ethernet eth0 {
        address 192.168.2.3/24
        description Local
        duplex auto
        firewall {
            in {
            }
            local {
            }
        }
        speed auto
    }
    ethernet eth1 {
        address dhcp
        description Internet
        dhcp-options {
            default-route update
            default-route-distance 210
            name-server update
        }
        dhcpv6-pd {
            no-dns
            pd 0 {
                interface switch0 {
                    host-address ::1
                    no-dns
                    prefix-id :1
                    service dhcpv6-stateless
                }
                prefix-length 56
            }
            rapid-commit enable
        }
        duplex auto
        firewall {
            in {
                ipv6-name WANv6_IN
                name WAN_IN
            }
            local {
                ipv6-name WANv6_LOCAL
                name WAN_LOCAL
            }
        }
        ipv6 {
            address {
                autoconf
            }
            dup-addr-detect-transmits 1
        }
        mac 44Man Very Happy9:E7:07:73:B5
        speed auto
    }
    ethernet eth2 {
        description Local
        duplex auto
        speed auto
    }
    ethernet eth3 {
        description Local
        duplex auto
        speed auto
    }
    ethernet eth4 {
        description Local
        duplex auto
        poe {
            output pthru
            watchdog {
                address 192.168.1.2
                failure-count 3
                interval 15
                off-delay 5
                start-delay 300
            }
        }
        speed auto
    }
    loopback lo {
    }
    switch switch0 {
        address 192.168.1.1/24
        description Local
        ipv6 {
            address {
                autoconf
            }
            dup-addr-detect-transmits 1
        }
        mtu 1500
        switch-port {
            interface eth2
            interface eth3
            interface eth4
        }
    }
}

this is what the interfaces are getting assigned

i dont know why i cant see the /56

admin@ERX:~$    show interfaces
Codes: S - State, L - Link, u - Up, D - Down, A - Admin Down
Interface    IP Address                        S/L  Description
---------    ----------                        ---  -----------
eth0         192.168.2.3/24                    u/u  Local
eth1         162.156.173.38/20                 u/u  Internet
eth2         -                                 u/u  Local
eth3         -                                 u/u  Local
eth4         -                                 u/D  Local
lo           127.0.0.1/8                       u/u
             ::1/128
switch0      192.168.1.1/24                    u/u  Local
             2001:569:741e:9901:46d9:e7ff:fe07:73be/64
             2001:569:741e:9901::1/64
admin@ERX:~$

@Connor

 

I don't know what type of networking stack you use on your router, and especially what is your DHCPv6 client, but from the listing of interface states it seems that your router gets assigned prefix 2001:569:741e:9900::/56. You chose the subnet 01 for switch0 so your LAN will have 2001:569:741e:9901::/64, as you can see from the two IPv6 addresses the route assigns itself. What is not clear is what happens on eth1. Your listing does not show any link-local addresses. 

 

You say you don't need your router to have public IPv6 addresses, but Actiontec does it, so I would go with it too, at least at first, until you have everything working OK. Then you may want to experiment and deviate from the standard behaviour. There is no shortage of addresses in IPv6!

 

Actiontec has two addresses, one for WAN and one for LAN, on subnets FF and 00, respectively. The latter can be configured to a different value, but the former not. Your router has also two addresses, but both on the switch side, subnet 01 (one fixed by configuration to ::1, another auto configured). You need to assign a global-scope address to eth1 that is on the same subnet as the upstream router. As I said, Actiontec uses FF for that subnet, I would stick wit it. Note that you never get an IPv6 address assigned from Telus, only prefix, so make sure that your DHCPv6 client does not ask for address assignment but just configures itself from the prefix. Some clients cannot do that.

@Paeonius Ok so yes after remembering i came to the conclusion that what the actiontecs are showing as WAN ipv6 address is not a wan ipv6 address

Its more technically a lan ipv6 address then a wan address because its assigned to the lan interface, and when i have tried putting the same address on wan jnstead of lan it doesnt work so telus actiontecs are refering to the lan ipv6 address as the wan ipv6 address

As for a link local ipv6 address on eth0 i have on and my devices pick it up as default gateway and a dns server

I dont get what you mean about i have 2 ipv6 addresses the short one isnt a full public address if i understand correct??

ok so just to clarify, is telus technically using SLAAC? or Stateless DHCPv6

because both work for me

  • Static (manual) address assignment – exactly like with IPv4, you can go on and apply the address yourself. I believe this is straight forward and therefore I am not going to demonstrate that.
  • Stateless Address Auto Configuration (SLAAC) – nodes listen for ICMPv6 Router Advertisements (RA) messages periodically sent out by routers on the local link, or requested by the node using an RA solicitation message. They can then create a Global unicast IPv6 address by combining its interface EUI-64 (based on the MAC address on Ethernet interfaces) plus the Link Prefix obtained via the Router Advertisement. This is a unique feature only to IPv6 which provides simple “plug & play” networking. By default, SLAAC does not provide anything to the client outside of an IPv6 address and a default gateway. SLAAC is greatly discussed in RFC 4862.
  • Stateless DHCPv6 – with this option SLAAC is still used to get the IP address, but DHCP is used to obtain “other” configuration options, usually things like DNS, NTP, etc. The advantage here is that the DHCP server is not required to store any dynamic state information about any individual clients. In case of large networks which has huge number of end points attached to it, implementing stateless DHCPv6 will highly reduce the number of DHCPv6 messages that are needed for address state refreshment.
  • Stateful DCHPv6 – functions exactly the same as IPv4 DHCP in which hosts receive both their IPv6 address and additional parameters from the DHCP server. Like DHCP for IPv4, the components of a DHCPv6 infrastructure consist of DHCPv6 clients that request configuration, DHCPv6 servers that provide configuration, and DHCPv6 relay agents that convey messages between clients and servers when clients are on subnets that do not have a DHCPv6 server. You can learn more about DHCP for IPv6 in RFC 3315.

NOTE: The only way to get a default gateway in IPv6 is via a RA message. DHCPv6 does not carry default route information at this time.

@Connor

Just to clarify: none of the above. The world of IPv6 is richer than that. The options above are for regular nodes, but for routers there are more possibilities, and Telus uses one of those. If your router software supports only the options you listed, then you are out of luck. You better replace the software or get a different router which can do what is required. It tested three different DHCPv6 clients before finding one that could do what was required here, and got it working only after significant customization with hook scripts.

 

Now the problem:

Telus does not use SLAAC to configure on-premises networks. RA messages are broadcast around quite infrequently, and they do not contain the prefix option. Telus prefixes are leased out, which makes the protocol stateful. Also, the M bit (managed) in RA is cleared, which means that the client should not attempt to obtain a Non-temporary Address (NA) through DHCPv6. It you request NA anyway, you just get error "No addresses available" back. Also the O bit (other information) in RA is cleared, which I believe is technically not correct (because you can get DNS servers through DHCPv6) but inconsequential. You get DNS addresses delivered anyway when you do a PD request, besides DNS is the least of your problems now. My guess is that Telus sets the O bit to zero just not to trick clients to assume that stateless DHCPv6 is the way to go with the prefix just temporarily missing.

 

So, to summarize: no RA-based SLAAC, and no stateless DHCPv6.

 

Telus uses stateful DHCPv6, but only for Prefix Delegation (PD), and not for Non-temporary Address (NA). This distinction is important, as many DHCPV6 clients assume that once you use stateful DHCPv6, you will get a global scope address from a NA request. This is a wrong assumption and will not work with Telus. The client must only request a PD, and then use this prefix to configure its interfaces, both LAN and WAN. It appears that your client does it correctly for the LAN side, most of them do. What it does is it takes the prefix assigned from Telus, (in your case it is 2001:569:741e:9900/56), completes it with a subnet number (in your case 01, probably because you specified prefix-id :1 in your configuration) which creates prefix 2001:569:741e:9901/64, and then generates two global scope IPv6 addresses on switch0. One is 2001:569:741e:9901::1, (because you hard-coded host-address to ::1), another one is EUI-64-generated 2001:569:741e:9901:46d9:e7ff:fe07:73be/64 (because you requested autoconf on switch0). So yes, you do have now two global scope IPv6 addresses on the LAN interface. One would be enough.

 

So far so good. What is missing is the address on the WAN interface (eth1). If your router is expecting an address on eth1 from Telus through SLAAC (is that the meaning of autoconf on eth1?) then it will never get configured. If it uses DHCPv6 NA requests, it will never get configured either. What it should do instead is exactly the same what it did on switch0: create a subnet (use FF), and an arbitrary host ID, (based on EUI-64 like Actiontec, or simply ::1 will be probably OK too), and use this to assign an IPv6 address to eth1. For instance, in your case it could  be 2001:569:741e:99FF::1/64, assuming you sill lease the same prefix as in your previous post. To test it, you may try temporarily assigning this address statically to eth1 and see whether you get connectivity. Caveat: we haven't discussed routing yet, and routing configuration with Telus also poses its own challenges. For now, just in case you do not get connectivity right away, just wait a few hours (without rebooting your router) to get one of the heartbeat RA and try again.

well my connectivity is actually working perfectly so there is really no need to change anything but you are probably right in that i only need one address, no idea why i would need a wan address....

ive figured everything out now and i have full ipv6 connectivity no problems im using SLAAC

i am not sending ia-na requests, they cause a 100% cpu problem, edgeos has a prefix-only option, and when i turned autoconf on it messed up everything  but yes by default slaac will send ia-na request

Jacobian
Just Moved In

the current solution says no ipv6.  How is ipv6 coming along?  How come telus modems dont automatically do ipv6?  Zyxtel, Alcatel, etc.

@Jacobian

IPv6 is here in Alberta but I don't know anywhere else.

bimmerdriver
Connector

Anyone got this working with pfsense? I'm trying to get it working but not having any success.